Friday, 7 May 2010

Tips for Smoothing out Basic Techniques

Basics are the cement which holds all martial artists fighting together. Without good basics one will never develop into an advanced fighter and it is for this reason that they must be drilled again and again.

Unfortunately though, it is very easy to concentrate on advanced training and basics can often get neglected. If this happens one will find that bad habits will develop and sloppiness will occur.

The following are steps which can be taken to work on basic techniques and hopefully they may help you to smooth out the rough patches which you may have developed.

Slow down – This is the first thing to do. Slow your training right down so that you are almost performing the technique in slow motion.

Train in front of a mirror – The mirror will tell you exactly where you are going wrong. It is probably the most useful training apparatus one can have.

Think about the technique – Some people train with music on which is fine, however if you are trying to work on a basic technique, turn the music off and maybe even train on your own so you can think about the technique and focus on it 100%

Drill it – Drill the technique until you can perform it perfect ten times in a row. Try not to get frustrated here as it can take time.

Although you may think that you may have regressed due to the fact that you have to work a basic technique try not to let it bother you. It is actually good because it gives you a chance to work your basics again, something which you may not have done for a while and it can break up a possible repetitive workout regime which may have developed.


Marks
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5 comments:

epicmartialarts said...

What exactly do you class as basic techniques? And what makes a technique advanced?

MARKS said...

I view basic techniques not as actual techniques like a knee strike or a jab but as attributes (search for basic martial art training) like using ones hips on punches, balance when moving etc.

By getting a firm understanding of these attributes one is able to perform actual technqiues much better and would then be able to move on to advanced training which invloves putting basic training togther during live sparring. (search advanced martial arts training)

Anonymous said...

Great photo. Othsuka and Suzuki I'm almost sure. Othsuka in a shikodashi stance side on. Wado always put a lot of emphasis on basics or Kihon but I'm not to sure they did to well turning the basics into fighting techniques. There was this great gap between basics and kumite like you had to guess the gap between the two. Any comments?

KarateStudent said...

KarateStudent ("KS") on "SMOOTHING OUT BASIC TECHNIQUES, PART I."

KS @ Epic Martial Arts--Re Difference between Basic & Advanced;
KS @ 'Anonymous' on Kihon vs. Kumite Gap.

Epic Martial Arts is raising exactly the question for turning traditional martial arts ("TMA") training, here karate, into highly effective, fighting prowess. The Anonymous comentator hits the issue right on point as well--the gap between kihon (basics) and kumite (fighting).

At my current Tang Soo Do (TSD) karate school, KS sees students plauged by this very issue all the time. And although the instructors can generally all spar decently, I typically see a great gap in their fighting effectiveness in many cases. Successfully making this transition is the whole working goal of TMA.

There is, IMO, a very good article in the current issue of "Black-Belt" magazine on this very subject. The author is a guy by the name of Matt Thorton. He has a martial art system of training called the 'Alive System.' He addresses how to bridge-the-gap between TMA training, to turn it into accomplished fighting skill.

In KS's view, TMA, here karate, does this implicitly. Matt Thorton hasn't come up with anything new. However, as the commentors & Matt Thorton have expressed, the path, mechanism, or way to make this transition is not obvious or clear or definite to many, or in many instances.

@ MARKS recent post on Lyoto Machida's loss to Shogun Rua, SENSEIMATTKLEIN suggested advanced boxing training as a solution to 'bridging-the-gap.' KS suggested taking a harder look at TMA karate training.

In doing this, KS did, in the past, adopt the TMA approach of another commentor @ that post, Wim Demeere, based on his training history. So on that, KS will give a traditional martial arts example of 'bridging-the-gap' in the comment to follow, "SMOOTHING OUT BASIC TECHNIQUES, PART II.

KarateStudent said...

KarateStudent ("KS") on, "SMOOTHING OUT BASIC TECHNIQUES, PART II."

One of the expert martial artists in MARKS network of commentors is Wim Demeere ("WD"). WD has cross-trained extensively in many styles of martial arts; he started out in kung fu.

KS also cross trains, though not to the degree of a professional like WD. Like WD, KS sought to understand tradtional martial arts as a whole, although KS 'base' is presently the hard-style karate of Tang Soo Do (TSD), not kung fu.

On KS's 1st return to his 1st traditional martial arts school, the head instructor (originally Tae Kwon Do), recognized my now keen interest in forms training. He introduced me to a series of three, kung fu-like forms. Later, KS came across some vidoes on the 'net (since lost) that had very similar forms, [yes, SenseiMattKlein], labeled Chinese Kempo.

The head instructor was teaching these forms to 'orange-belt' level students, seemingly basic forms. Like all forms, a lot of the techniques did not seem readily applicable to a 'live' fight. They were not the rapid-fire techniques seen in the Japanese & Hawaiian kenpos.

As KS'S knowledge grew, I came to see that the nature of the movement taught by these forms, though somewhat basic in appearance (far more involved than TSD kicho hyung), was in fact advanced. The movement was more fluid and continuous compared to the strictly strength-based exercises and discipline of the hard-style karates. The emphasis, even more demanding physically in some respects compared to TSD, was on smoothly engaging the whole body in every action, and onto the next step.

WD states that he found kung fu training challenged him greatly, physically & mentally. KS echoes the same with these purportedly Chinese Kempo (applied kung fu?) forms. The head instructor supplemented these Kempo forms with some similar, Kempo-type sparring techniques, extremely taxing both physically & mentally.

THE LESSON LEARNED: The Highly Physical Training Provided By The Hard-Style Karates Provides A Physically Strong, Mentally Disciplined Foundation For Practical Karate Fighting.

THE 'BASIC' CHINESE KEMPO' TRAINING ADDED THE DIMENSION OF GREATER FLUIDITY AND CONTINUITY OF MOTION WITH EVEN GREATER DRAWING UPON & ENGAGING THE ENTIRE BODY ==> RESULTING IN MORE DECISIVE, DYANAMIC, MOVEMENT BOTH PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY.

KS concludes that you don't need Chinese Kempo to become highly-skilled at karate. KS does say that the underlying martial skills taught by the Chinese Kempo exercises really enabled me to 'bridge-the-gap' from basic karate to advanced fighting (& training) capability.

BOXING? FOR KS NO WAY!!

NEXT: TRADITIONAL CHINESE KEMPO AGAINST THE BOXER'S (or even Kyokushin Karate) GUARD.

@MARKS March, 2010 Post, "EXPELL STUDENTS WHO DON'T SPAR?"

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