Monday, 30 November 2009

REPOST: Raw Strength (Squats on One Leg)

The following is a repost, back from October 2007 when MarksTraining.com was just starting out. Hope you enjoy it if you have never seen it before.

To be able to generate a hard shocking roundhouse or side kick requires strength in the legs. Training to obtain this strength is very hard without the use of weights and because your legs are big and powerful you may require a lot of weight, which means going to the gym.

Another alternative is the squat on one leg. There easy to do, and can be done anywhere. I like incorporating them straight after practising kicks on the heavy bag. Sometimes you see some people doing these by just extending there leg, as if holding a front kick, and squatting on there supporting leg in that position. I don't recommend this way as i find it places a lot of stress on the squatting knee.

Firstly i use a wall for balance (you don't have to use a wall but i like to work strength and balance separately). Then i get into the starting position which is the chambered position of a roundhouse kick (this will turn your supporting foot slightly). Holding the wall with one hand and the chambered foot with the other i start the squat, going just past parallel to the floor with my thigh. To finish the movement, i push so my leg is straight again (not locked) and perform a roundhouse kick with the chambered leg finishing again in the chambered position ready to squat again. This should all be done in a slow but fluid motion.

Usually i do this for ten repetitions each leg, and 4 sets.

It's a real burn in the thighs but excellent for building raw strength.

I felt it necessary to repost this article because I feel the one legged squat is an excellent training exercise for any martial artist of any style. It is an exercise which I have not performed in a while until recently and after carrying it out for a few weeks I have felt my leg strength and kicking power explode to new levels. The way I have been performing the exercise is the same as posted, however, if you have another way of doing it feel free to let us know in the comments section below.

Marks
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Friday, 27 November 2009

Anton Geesink's Judo

Todays video post is dedicated to one of Judo’s greatest competition fighters of all time, Anton Geesink and his use of off balancing and sweeps.

Geesink is a 10th Dan Judoka (recognized only under IJF and not Kodokan) from the Netherlands who won in the final of the open weight division of the 1964 summer Olympics where Judo debuted as an official sport in Japan.

He has worked also as a professional wrestler working on the All Japan Pro Wrestling circuit from 1973 to 1978 and has a street named after him in his home town of Utrecht.



The above video shows him using ko soto gari after a failed sasae tsurikomi ashi. He capitalizes quickly with the ko soto, while his opponent is still of balance from the previous throw attempt.



The above video shows Geesink utilizing sasae tsurikomi ashi and uchi mata with great result. Notice how he does not stop his uchi mata until he has thrown his opponent. Most people do not have the commitment in the throw the way Geesink demonstrates here, and retreat once it fails the first time.



In this last video we see him starting with again sasae tsurikomi ashi, but ends up throwing with hiza guruma. What must be pointed out here is the big and strong initial pull he uses to disrupt his opponents balance, before attempting the sweep. It is this off balancing (kuzushi) what creates the throw and every other throw in Judo.

This is why Geesink was so successful. Yes, his size and strength helped but without a great ability to initially take people off balance, they do not mean a thing. This is pure Judo.

Marks
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Wednesday, 25 November 2009

Bad Habits in the Martial Arts

At some stage during ones training they shall come across bad habits. The kicker about bad habits is that it is rare that one will see these bad habits themselves. They can creep up on a martial artist at anytime and to some can take years to break, if every broken at all!

They can be anything. A low guard when punching, telegraphed movements, not getting low enough under your opponents hips on takedowns and throws, not using the correct amount of leverage on submissions opting for strength instead etc. The list is endless, and it is most likely that when learning, during your initial stages of martial arts training, these bad habits were not there, but have developed as time has gone by.

It is very easy to confuse bad habits with ones own personal style of fighting, but end of the day, if these bad habits are leading you towards becoming an ineffective fighter, then they must be broken. The good part to bad habits however, is that with thoughtful training, they can be broken.

Below are a few ways in which one can tackle bad habits in the martial arts.

Listen to criticism – This is one of the hardest thinks to do, especially if one has been training for quite some time and has developed a certain style of fighting unique to them. However, if different people keep telling you of the same bad habit/s which you may have developed, listen to the comments and try and see for yourself if it is true. Never just shrug them off thinking that they do not know what they are talking about, because maybe they will be correct.

Ask a senior – It could be one of the black belts, a pro fighter you may know, but most of the times if not always it should be your trainer/coach/sensei, whatever you call that person. Go and ask them weather the comments you have received about these certain bad habits are true. As your trainer, he/she should notice them straight away and should then focus on trying to help you break them.

Train slowly – Go back to basic slow training when training on your own or with a partner. Perform your movements slowly, paying strict attention on trying to break the bad habits you have developed.

Use a mirror – The mirror is one of the best training aids available. It will never lie to you and shall let you know weather you are still performing these bad habits or weather they are being broken.

Tell your sparring partners to capitalize specifically on your bad habits - Lets say that your bad habit is that after each cross punch you don’t return to a fighting stance quick enough, but just drop your punching arm down. Tell your partner that every time this happens he should pull you forwards to the floor, (which is very easy to do by the way if you are leaning too far forward after a sloppy cross punch!) This is a way for you to not only be reminded of the bad habit so you can think about breaking it, but it is a way to show you that the bad habit can leave you in a bad position, which is the case for nearly all bad habits.

Bad habits WILL occur in ones training. That can not be helped but as long as one understands that they are not perfect and it is possible for anyone to develop them, only then will one be able to start working towards breaking them. Train slowly and cautiously and eventually it/they shall be broken.


Marks
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Monday, 23 November 2009

Sparring, Hard and Soft

When it comes to sparring, there are two ways in which it can be carried out, which are hard or soft. Weather it is striking, throws and takedowns, ground grappling or a mixture of all, sparring can be done in a hard fashion or a soft fashion.

Hard sparring – Hard sparring means that sparring should be carried out with full intensity and that your aim is to win every encounter with your opponent. An encounter could be something as simple as defending your opponent who is trying to pass your guard, or attacking with a 3 punch combination followed by a roundhouse kick. In hard sparring, the aim is to not let your opponent off with anything and to take advantage of every opportunity.

Soft Sparring – During soft sparring, although the intensity should still be high, your aim is to not always win every encounter, but to purposely let your opponent sometimes get the better of you and vice versa. By doing this, there is an allowance between the both of you to practise certain techniques, combinations or strategies with the satisfaction of being able to practise, something that does not happen in hard sparring. If you have your opponent in your guard for example and he is trying to pass, allow him to pass you a few times, or if striking, allow your partner to practise a defence and attack combination without fighting back. Offer some resistance, maybe 50% worth but allow your opponent to practise techniques and hopefully he should do the same for you.

Hard sparring MUST be carried out when preparing for competitions, simply because the nature of competitions is to win. Also hard sparring is a must for self defence. One must always have in mind to win on the streets and if one does not train to win and to take advantage of every opportunity that comes there way, no matter how “dirty” it may seem, then they shall be doing themselves an injustice.

By soft sparring only, one will not truly prepare for battle adequately, and rarely will be able to cope with the rush of competition fighters or a self defence situation on the street. However, saying that, soft sparring does have its place. By sparring softly, one is able to practise techniques and is able to alter any problems that occur with them with them, under sparring conditions where there is some resistance. Soft sparring allows martial artists to programme timing, movement and a repertoire of techniques into there muscles so that they can be used without even thinking, when engaging in hard sparring later.

Sparring is a means to an end. A way of practising for real combat, be it on the street or in a sporting event. Sparring must be carried out thoughtfully and with patience. Those who use sparring as a way to beat up people are doing themselves and there sparring partners no favours. Sparring gives one the chance to practise executing the techniques, they spend hours learning and drilling, on bags, up and down the dojo or even from books and videos. If it is used wisely, it can produce some unbelievable results.


Marks
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Friday, 20 November 2009

Muay Thai - Knee Strike

Lasts weeks video was all about the elbow strike, demonstrated in pure Muay Thai fashion! Today’s video is again demonstrated in Thai fashion but is dedicated to the knee strike.

Just like the elbow strike, when close in and especially from the clinch, the knee can end fights quickly and effectively. The knee MUST be trained if one wants to become an all round fighter. Disregarding it, thinking that there are more important techniques to spend training time on is bad judgment and could land a fighter in trouble one day.



Marks
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Thursday, 19 November 2009

Psy-ki-do - Psychic Blood and Gore!

Pat Parker here from Mokuren Dojo. Today Marks has graciously allowed me to post an interesting little piece of pseudoscience here on his otherwise most excellent blog. This is the latest in my series of blog posts inspired by the movie, The Men who Stare at Goats - you can see my previous post in the series at Dojo Rat's blog, and here's the intro to the series at Mokuren Dojo.

Have you ever noticed in sparring or randori that there are some opponents that just absolutely freak you out? The kind of person that you're wholly reluctant to engage with becuse you feel like they look at you the same way a wolf looks at a baby goat? Nothing that you know works for you because you're either too jittery or else you're paralyzed. Predators have this effect on prey animals. It's not a learned trait in the prey animal; you can put a rabbit in a cage next to a dog and it will behave like a prey animal even if it's never seen a dog. The same type of thing happens in people too.

Here's the experiment...

Just before a sparring or randori match, as you are getting ready to begin, start thinking the most violent, evil, predatory thoughts about what you are about to do to your opponent. You don't have to change your face or posture or the energy of the match or anything - just start thinking about blood... your opponent's blood, and lots of it running through your fingers... Pile up evil thought upon evil thought about the gruesome, painful, humiliating, degrading demise that you are about to perpetrate on your opponent. Add as much awful detail as you can. After you have run through this line of thinking, do the sparring match being careful not to be extra rough or fast or mean. Just randori as usual. Then, after the match, try to figure out if it went differently. Was your opponent more defensive than usual? Did you feel any different than usual about the match? Ask your partner how they thought you did during the match.

I think you'll find that after just a little practice, you can impose this sort of predator-prey mindset on most any match you want to. With a little more practice, this can be an outstanding tool to use against opponents that give you the willies. Rather than letting them have their way with you, you can make them realize that you're a predator too. Make them understand that they might eat you in the end, but they will have to trade a lot of blood and guts for the meal.

Pats blog, Mokuren Dojo is well worth the look if you dont know of it. Crammed with years worth of blogging on Judo, Aikido, Karate and other interesting topics, it is clear that Pat is not only a humble martial artist, but one who seriously knows his stuff! It has been a joy to have Pat guest post here and for me to do the same at his blog.(check the post here) Hopefully soon, we shall work together again so stay tuned.


Marks

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Wednesday, 18 November 2009

Muay Thai Front Leg Bounce

Most martial arts have something that they only do. Something that is unique solely to them. If any one knows about Muay Thai then one will know that Thai fighters during sparring or fighting will adopt a strategy regarding there stance that is rarely seen outside of Muay Thai gyms.

As they are squared off with there opponent, they stand in there fighting stance but place most of there weight on there back leg and then calmly lift there front foot up and down, similar to doing a short calf raise, acting like an antenna, feeling the opponents movements and ready to attack or defend when necessary.

The foot does not come up off the floor much, just enough for the ball of the foot to be slightly still touching the floor, but is kept relaxed and waiting to explode.

This is something, as said above, unique to Thai fighters, and even then, most western Thai fighters don’t employ the technique but always adopt a more kickboxing style stance. Karate fighters have what is called a cat stance (neko ashi dachi) which is similar, offering many of the same advantages, but is rarely used in actual combat. Thai fighters have mastered this technique and have benefited from the advantages it offers. However, whenever there are advantages, most of the time there are always disadvantages.

ADVANTAGES
Allows for quick teeps – The teep is a front kick action used either to strike or as a stop hit defence. It must be fast. By performing this leg action when in a stance, a Muay Thai fighter can quickly execute the front leg teep when needed.

Allows for quick shin blocks – Leg kicks are staple techniques of Muay Thai and because of this, so is shin blocking. Just like the teep the shin block must be executed fast so as to defend in time. By having the front leg poised and ready to react one can carry this out.

Is used to distract an opponents thoughts – By constantly moving up and down the front leg, an opponent can easily become distracted by this. During this period of distraction, the opponent may forget about all other limbs and could fall prey to punches or kicks with the back leg.

DISADVANTAGES
It can leave one thinking only about front leg attacks – By moving only the front leg, it can sometimes become easy to think about using only that limb and to ignore others.

Can be easily taken down – By keeping the front leg loose and ready, this means that most of the weight is placed on the back leg and if a hard sweep or kick to the back leg is taken one may easily be taken down.

Can restrict movement – Another bad point of having most of the weight on the back leg is that movement can be heavily restricted. A lot of Thai fighters prefer to actually take shots rather than move away from them, but there is only so much of this one can take.

So as you can see, there are good and bad points to the Muay Thai fighting stance strategy. It should definitely be practised by all as the advantages it possesses can be more than useful for ones fighting style, however, one must always be aware of its disadvantages.


Marks
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Sunday, 15 November 2009

The Back Roundhouse Kick

The back roundhouse kick is risky. There is no doubt about it. Turning you back to strike with the foot requires accuracy, hence lots of training and even then the chances of a full on, perfect strike are small.

Having said this, the back roundhouse kick can be one of the most pleasing techniques to watch. Also if it lands it can be devastating, and can easily cause a knockout.

So if you are one of the people who think that it would be worth adding to your fighting arsenal, here are a few points to consider when practising the technique.

Don’t turn your head too early - Your head should be the last body part that turns and more importantly, your eyes should be focused on your target. This will allow you to take your eyes away from the target for no more than a split second.

Your eyes should see your target first – The above point takes us to the next point that your eyes should see your target before your foot strikes the target. This will allow for a better chance of striking the target with enough accuracy as possible.

The kicking leg must be controlled – A trend with this technique is to swing the kicking leg as fast as possible so as to strike harder. Although this can be effective, it is safer to keep control of the keeping leg so as it does not take one off balance.

Use the heel – This is a power strike so make sure you use the most powerful part of the foot to strike, the heel.

Keep you hands up and in front
– Because there is a chance that the strike will miss and go out of control, always keep your hands up and in front of you so as to protect against any incoming blows.

As mentioned, this is a risky technique. It does have a place in martial arts as it can be devastating, but always remember to use it with caution and sparingly, just as with all others.


Marks
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Friday, 13 November 2009

Muay Thai - Elbow Strike

Today’s video is dedicated to the elbow strike. Although it is a common technique found in the syllabus of many martial arts, there are few styles which endorse AND use it as much as Muay Thai.

Even in Muay Thai, western fighters today, seem to use it sparingly, favouring more short hooks and uppercuts when close in fighting. However, fighters from Thailand are different. There style of fighting is slightly different to westerners and what’s more, they still use the elbow to great effect as this short tutorial will demonstrate.

Although some of the knockouts shown may be slightly brutal to watch for some, they are clear indicators on to just how effective and dangerous the elbow strike can be.

COME BACK NEXT FRIDAY, FOR A VIDEO POST ON THE MUAY THAI KNEE STRIKE!!



Marks
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Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Martial Artists Training Every Muscle Group

Most martial artists now realise the importance of supplemental weight training to strengthen there muscles for better technique, however, some think that they should avoid training certain muscle groups or shouldn’t train too much weights so they do not develop bodybuilder type physiques.

It is actually very hard to develop ones muscle mass of that of a bodybuilder. Years of hard weight training, and heavy eating will lead to very large muscles, but if one controls there food intake and is regularly training martial arts, it is almost impossible that they will get as big as a Ronnie Coleman or a Jay Cutler.

It is very important to train every muscle group in the body, not neglecting one over the other as each has a function and a purpose. If strength training is neglected in one muscle group over the other, one will firstly create a muscular imbalance which is not good for the body, but secondly as a martial artist, one will be leaving a broken link in there chain so to speak. A weakness that may cause problems to ones fighting. Below are the reasons why every muscle group must be trained.

Arms - The arms are used with all hand strikes, and defences. The wrists need to be strong to grip an opponents gi or tough enough to grip an opponents head when clinch fighting. Arm strength alone should not be the main focus when concerned with most martial art techniques but it is definitely needed and for this reason arm training is important.

Legs – The legs are a major muscle group and the muscles of the thighs are used with almost every martial art technique, weather on the ground or standing. A lot of people neglect leg training simply because it is very hard, but the fact is, without strong legs one could seriously be losing out as an overall powerhouse of a martial artist.

Back – Like the legs, the back is also very important to train. For grapplers especially, a strong back will help prevent injury when lifting, pulling and turning. The lower back is part of the core body muscles and by strengthening it, one will be able to make hip turning, which is used for striking and throwing, much more explosive, hence effective.

Chest – A push and a punch are the main ways in which the chest is used through martial arts techniques. Strong chest muscles are vital if one wants to become a stronger puncher. Plus strong chest muscles will help take the impact from strikes to the chest, something that Kyokushinkai Karate fighters strive to improve constantly.

Shoulders – If ones shoulders are weak, it will be very hard to keep ones guard up which result in one being susceptible to a head shot which could cause one to be knocked out. Also many techniques with the arms such as punches, wrestling and clinch fighting will become almost useless. Strong shoulders are another important muscle group that must be given attention.

Neck – A strong neck will help in preventing one getting knocked out through heavy punches, and will allow a grappler to bridge on his head without straining himself Enough said!

Abs – The core is one of, if not the most important muscle group that a martial artist has to develop. Involved in all strikes, nearly all grappling techniques and nearly all movements, a strong core will help keep a fighter strong, well balanced and able to take body shots. It should never be neglected.

These are merely some of the ways in which the muscles of the body are used for martial arts, why they as so important to develop and why they should never be neglected. If one is worried that there martial arts will deteriorate whilst strengthening the muscles through weights, then don’t be. Ones martial arts will actually become better (as long as the weight training movements are carried out correctly).


Marks
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Monday, 9 November 2009

Foot Sweep Tips

Foot sweeps are techniques that most people either love or they hate. They are not techniques that one can perform with little practise as there are many points to remember when sweeping and for this reason they demand much training and respect.

Although they are not fight finishers, they are certainly ways in which a fighter can be put in a position TO finish a fight. They are sneaky ways to let a person know not to come to close to you and they can be used as a great defence to high kicks, as long as the timing is right. However, many people simply cannot get sweeps right.

Well if this is you, firstly, remember that sweeps are very hard, and no one gets them correct all the time. Secondly, chances are, there is something relatively small you may be getting wrong. Maybe one of the tips below can help?

Sweep the ankle – One of the main mistakes people perform when sweeping is to sweep too high up the leg, making contact with there opponents shin, or in some extreme cases, the knee. Sweeps must be kept low towards the ankle. Not only will the sweep work this way but it will also be less painful then hitting the shin.

Use the sole to sweep – A lot of people use the side of the foot or sometimes the instep to sweep, simply because it is harder to bend the foot and use the sole. By using the sole one is able to use a wider surface to really “cup” the ankle, which gives the success rate of the sweep a higher percentage.

Sweeps must be followed through – Sweeps must be followed through enough so as to be effective. This means that instead of just tapping the foot or following through a few inches, it is necessary in most cases to follow sweeps through at least half a foot.

The opponent must be off balance when sweeping – Sweeps are only effective if the person being swept is off balance. Judo practitioners pull there opponent hard in order to take them off balance, karate fighters try to catch there opponents as they are moving and off balance. A leg that is planted firmly on the floor is very hard to sweep.

Full commitment to the technique – A lot of times, people attempt sweeps for the hell of it thinking that if they get lucky then it is a bonus. Unless the technique is merely a feint or a setup for another technique, sweeps must be given full commitment with the thought of success in ones mind.

These are just a few tips to think about next time you are practising sweeps. As mentioned above, they are hard and require lots of practise to be effective but with correct knowledge of how to perform them and with much training, slowly, the way to carry them out will become second nature and they shall start to flow more easily in sparring.


Marks
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Friday, 6 November 2009

Larry Hartsell

Today’s video is dedicated to the late Larry Hartsell, RIP. (August 15, 1942 – August 20, 2007) Larry was a martial artist who began with Judo, moved onto Kempo, studying under Ed Parker and then trained privately with Bruce Lee. After Lee’s death, Larry continued training under Dan Inosanto in which he explored and researched additions to the grappling techniques which now form the core of the Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do Grappling System. He also worked as a bodyguard for people such as Mr T and was a trainer for the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers. (For more info about Larry, please see here)

What is interesting about this video is firstly some of the submissions he demonstrates. He uses a variety of various submissions from a single position. For instance, when demonstrating the knee bar, he also demonstrates a number of submissions from the knee bar position, such as heel hooks, ankle locks etc. It is good for all martial artists to also do this. From a submission position, try to figure out what other submissions can also be achieved. It is good to have an idea of some backup techniques that one can quickly transition to if the one they are trying fails.

The video also gives a short interview with Larry about his initial training, his involvement with Ed Parker and Kempo and how he got started training with Bruce Lee. This may also be interesting to watch. Enjoy.



Marks
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Wednesday, 4 November 2009

The Squat, A Great Exercise

Some people say that the squat is the king of exercises when it comes to weight training. Some people say that it is the king of ALL exercises, period. Others think that it should be avoided at all costs. Many people have strained there lower backs with squats are have popped there knees with them. Here at MarksTraining.com though, we love squats! They are seen as one of the best exercises one can do and deserve an article written solely about them.

The squat is one of the oldest exercises known to man. It is one of the three main power training movements, the others being, deadlifts and bench presses. Although there are squat machines that people can use to perform the exercise, which do help one focus all there energy into using the muscles of the thigh only, many still feel that the free weight squat is the way to go for size and strength.

So what are the major benefits of squatting?

Will blow up your lower body – Squatting is the best exercise if muscle gain is your goal. Not only will it make your thigh muscles grow but it will also make the muscles of your backside and to a lesser extent the muscles of the side of your torso and calves grow. Some people may not like this and if that’s the case, watch how much squatting you do, but others who are really thin or who are looking to pack on some quality muscle will welcome this type of growth.

Will work your cardio – After performing a few sets of squats with reps more than 12 per set one will notice that they are breathing more heavily than with other weight training movements and that they may be starting to sweat. Since squatting uses up a lot of energy it is also a good way to combine strength training with cardiovascular conditioning.

Will help you lift more on other exercises – Some people will not agree with this, but others (including myself) have sworn that by doing heavy squats, they are able to lift heavier on other exercises. This in turn leads to further gains in strength and body mass. Whatever the reason this is, who knows, but maybe it will work for you too.

Will train your mind – There is no exercise more daunting in the gym than the heavy squat. Having to load a heavy bar full of clanging metal plates into ones shoulders, and then having to squat with them, can seriously challenge the confidence of some. On the other hand, one of the best feelings one can have is to know that they took on that heavy squat and completed the required reps, pushing through the pain and blocking out all thoughts of quitting from ones mind. By squatting heavy, one can eventually develop a “never back down attitude” which can spread into other areas of ones life. This may be the most important reason to squat.

Weather you are a martial artist, any other kind of athlete or just a normal person, im sure you will agree that the above benefits apply to all. For this reason, next time you see that squat bar and are intimidated because you may be new to squatting, don’t be. Start slow, with light weight, grab a spotter or a trainer to show you the correct technique just in case and after a few squat sessions, start noticing the beneficial differences it brings.


Marks
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Monday, 2 November 2009

Punching Power, Top 5 Methods

Punching with power is something that everybody wants to be able to do right from the start. Just like rookie weight trainers try to develop there pecs and biceps, rookie punches wish to develop there power.

However, a lot of people simply do not go about the correct ways in order to achieve there goal.

Below are the MarksTraining.com top 5 methods to produce harder punches, 5 being the least important and 1 being the most important. Obviously, some will disagree with this top 5 and may have there own opinions, which we invite you to comment about.

5) Weight Training

Weight training definitely helps to build muscle, ligament and tendon strength for hard punching, however, one can develop a hard punch without it and for this purpose, it is not considered as important as the methods below.

4) Heavy Bag Punching

By using the heavy bag, one will learn how to hit a stationary or slightly moving target, whilst also strengthening the wrists, so harder punching can then develop. However, a heavy bag is not an opponent, and learning how to hit a moving target which is what your opponent is, requires further, more important training.

3) Focus Pads/Sparring

The reason why focus pads and sparring are together here is that with both methods one learns how to punch hard against a moving target. A heavy bag may be still, a punching board such as a makiwara is also still. By hitting still targets one does not learn how to punch whilst also moving, which is much harder to do and something that is necessary when facing an opponent, hence it is more important than heavy bag work. By training on the pads and sparring whilst hitting and moving, one will learn the correct ways to develop power punches with movement.

2) Learning to Breath

Obviously you know how to breath, but many people who are just starting martial arts, tend to hold there breath whilst executing strikes. By doing this, your shoulders become tense, your body becomes rigid, movement becomes slower and as a result, strikes become weaker. By learning how to breathe whilst striking will aid in relaxation and as a result, punches will become more powerful. Without correct breathing and relaxation, one will never be able to use the bag properly or spar with finesse so it should be given much attention and is ranked as number 2.

1) Body Rotation/Positioning

Something many will not agree on, but here at MarksTraining.com, body rotation and positioning is given top priority when concerned with power punching. To punch with power one needs to turn there hips and bodies with each punch which helps to project the punching arm and hand forward with not only speed but with as much power as possible which works in the same way as a sling shot. Using arm strength alone may produce some power, but the body is much bigger and stronger than the arm and using it whilst punching will produce much better results. Also, positioning should be addressed. For example, a lot of people allow the elbow to fly out away from the body with straight punches, which restricts power. One should always keep there elbows in pointing towards the floor as much as possible when punching. (Apart from with hooks, but even here, they should also be tight and not too wild)

So this is the MarksTraining.com, top 5 ways to develop power punching. It is not something that can happen over night, but needs plenty of practise and even more patience. It is very easy for one to get carried away and start punching as hard as possible from the start. This will not only lead to sloppiness but it will be harder for one to develop power later as bad habits may develop and will prove difficult to break. Learn steadily and patiently and results will soon come.


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