Sunday, 24 May 2009

Lyoto Machida Knocks out Rashad Evans!

Congratulations to Lyoto Machida. Using his diverse martial arts training and wrapping it all around Shotokan Karate he became Light Heavyweight UFC Champion of the World, knocking out Rashad Evans in the second round! Osu!



Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com



Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Friday, 22 May 2009

Rickson Gracie Losing a Match?

Is the following a video of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu master and undefeated MMA fighter Rickson Gracie getting beaten in Japan?

But as you have probably guessed, yes, it has nothing to do with martial arts competition of any kind.

I found the following video in which he takes part in a funny game in Japan.


Rickson Gracie - Funny home videos are a click away

It looks like the rules are to either push your opponent over or remove the stick from the back of there helmet.

If there are any readers who understand Japanese, we would be very grateful if you would translate what is going on for us, plus, let us know if Rickson actually did lose.

Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Wing Chun Demonstration
Cardio Exercises, Which is Best
Martial Arts and the Deadlift
Bad Balance when Punching
Street Fighting Weapons

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 20 May 2009

Talking During Training

For some, one of the most annoying things when training at the gym or dojo is when someone starts talking and they go on seemingly forever. To make matters worse, it may not even be about something regarding training but a topic completely irrelevant. People train for different reasons. Some like going to the gym and talking for a while between sets. This is fine and if it is what relaxes you and takes away the stresses of the day, then carry on doing it. But if you are not one of these people, you need to think about maybe altering your training to either go alone, or with others who prefer to train hard, and leave the talking until after.

Get your judo gi for less.

The average person who devotes an hour or two in there day for training normally has in mind the thought of training as quickly and efficiently as possible. Work, family and other commitments probably take up the majority or most people lives and they simply can not afford to waste time by chatting.

Many times myself I have been training in the gym when someone walks in who I have not seen for a while. They end up talking and talking and before I know it, ten minutes have passed since my last set. For a while, I thought it rude to tell them that I was there to train and to ask to be allowed to continue, but now I understand that this may be needed.

Looking at it from a physical point of view, by chatting excessively, the person talking and the person or people listening are resting there bodies. For the minute or so when resting between rounds or sets in the gym, this is ok, but if it continues, the heart rate will slow down, the body temperature will cool and the intensity will drop. If your training with weights, most of the time this is the complete opposite of what you want to be happening. Keeping the intensity high is something needed from fat loss to gaining muscle. Also, if you rest too much via excessive chatting between rounds when training martial arts, you muscles and joints will cool and when you start training again, you could end up injuring yourself.

On the other hand, not all talking during training is bad. Quick discussions which are relevant to the training session are always encouraged so questions can be answered and knowledge can be gained. However, if the “quick discussion” turns into a debate or an off topic conversation it must be stopped instantly so as training time does not get disrupted.

The best way to deal with someone who constantly talks is to be polite but straight to the point. Something like “Please can we get back on with training, we can talk about this later. I hope you don’t mind”. This is blunt and quickly explaining that you would like to keep training but also polite and shouldn’t cause any friction between you and others.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
300 Posts! A Look Back in Time
Karate Lunge Punch Practical Applications
Sparring Mistakes and Progression
The Importance of Good Reflexes
Arm Bar form the Gaurd

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Sunday, 17 May 2009

Ground Grappling Basic Pointers

For beginners first starting ground grappling, it can be very exciting. As soon as there first lesson is under way they rush to learn as many submission holds as possible, thinking that the more they know, the better they shall be. The truth is that grappling is very much an art form, and what makes it an art form is that there is more to it than just submission holds.

Great punching bags at great prices

Below are four tips that beginners should bear in mind and try and focus on when starting there grappling training. Not only will it improve there game it will also make them become aware of body mechanics, and the best ways one can control there opponent in order to apply submissions.

Control your opponent with every part of your body – In life, we are used to using our hands to do everything from holding things, moving things, controlling things etc. When grappling, you must learn to control your opponent with your whole body and not just your hands. Use you legs to keep your opponent from getting close to you, stop your opponent moving by weighing them down with your hips when on top, break holds and apply submissions by using leverage created from tight body positioning etc.

Keep your hips moving – When fighting from your back, one must learn to move there hips from underneath there opponent in order to create space to move away, apply submissions or transition into a dominant position. Using your strength to push or pull your opponent will not last for long, if at all.

Move on the balls of your feet
– Beginner grapplers quickly learn that brute strength will not get them far and that good hip movement is one of the most important parts of ground fighting. However, good movement on the balls of ones feet is also vital in order to move around the opponent when on top. From side control for instance, it is good light movements on the balls of ones feet that will enable one to control and move around there opponent in order to keep a good dominant position on top of them.

Transition and position always before submission
– It takes 5 seconds for one to learn how to perform a submission. How to apply one however, in live sparring, against a struggling opponent, takes many hours of practise and the only way one is able to apply submissions is by gaining good transitional skills and a high understanding of positions for the application of submission holds. This is very important and for beginners, this should occupy there attention the most is possible when learning ground grappling.

By bearing these points in mind, beginner grapplers will quickly lean that ground fighting is a step by step process rather than a match of strength or a test to see who can apply a submission hold first. If beginners bear these points in mind when starting training they shall quickly come to grips with ground grappling and shall excel in the art.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Mario Sperry Guard Pass
Tips for the Arm Bar (Juji Gatame)
Finger Locks
MMA Training - Mixing the Arts
Leg Locks in Judo

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Friday, 15 May 2009

Kata Bunkai with Vince Morris

Karate is a martial art that has its roots in a wide variety of different fighting systems learned by many people throughout time. These people have recorded there fighting methods or students that have trained under them have recorded them, in Katas. These kata bunkai (fighting applications) show effective and most often than not brutal techniques which are designed to end street confrontations as quick as possible.

Cheap prices on sparring gear.

Many times in various Karate Katas you see the following arm movements.



Sometimes as in Pinan Shodan above, the person performing is standing up right, other times bending down as in Kushanku.

True to the nature of authentic kata bunkai, Sensei Vince Morris demonstrates one possible and very practical throw from these movements which is taken from Kushanku. When performed at full speed and without the luxury of a padded floor the throw can be very devastating, and depending on where you grip your opponent it can be made a lot worse! For these reasons, if you intend to practise the technique, use extreme caution and never practise it at full speed.



Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Wado Ryu Karate with Tatsuo Suzuki
Mount or Side Mount for MMA
Top Submission Holds in Martial Arts
Mastering the One Handed Press Up
Judo Ne Waza

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 13 May 2009

Sweeps for Self Defence

Sweeps are great techniques. There is no doubt about there effectiveness for taking someone to the floor using the least amount of energy. Although much practise is needed in order to become competent using them they are worth investing the time.

During martial arts competitions, they are used to unbalance or take fighters down so as to follow up with other techniques which may be for scoring points, gaining dominant positions on the ground or for knocking out an opponent for a victory.

Subscribe to sports illustrated for $20.

For the street however, not only can they be used for the same reasons as competition, but they are also great for stalling attacks from one of multiple opponents and they provide chances to run away.

Judo style sweeps are nearly always performed whilst two people are grappling, either holding each others clothing or body parts. They are quick, can be very subtle and if performed correctly are hard to counter or defend. Most of the time they lead, to the person being swept, taken to the floor or at the very least there balance broken, allowing for follow up techniques or a chance to escape.

Karate style sweeps differ in the fact that they tend to happen without one having to hold the other person. Karate fighters in general, have one leg in front of the other when in there stance and move around on the balls of there feet as opposed to the majority of judo fighters who are flat footed with there legs closer together. Because of there constant moving around, there balance can easily be disrupted via a well timed foot sweep and on many occasions, fighters are taken to the floor with them.

As to which type of sweep is best for self defence, there is no answer apart from they are both useful and should both definitely be practised. Karate style sweeps have the advantage that one does not need to become involved in a grappling situation for them to be performed, but timing and proper sweep technique must be stressed for them to work. On the other hand, one may argue that because street encounters happen so fast and may become grappling situations in a blink of an eye, judo style sweeps may have the advantage.

What must be remembered is that although sweeps are great for taking someone to the floor and delaying an attack, which is especially useful against multiple opponents, the chances of sweeps stopping an attack altogether are minimal. The person swept will most likely try and get back up and continue with there intentions. One must follow up with further techniques accordingly if needed, or get away from the situation whilst there opponent is down. Only in the movies does an opponent fall and stay down holding there leg in pain because of a sweep.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Reality of Street Fights
The Side Kick in Martial Arts, is it Effective?
Ineffective Martial Art Techniques
Street Fighting Weapons
Goshin Jutsu Training

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Monday, 11 May 2009

A Great Self Defence Technique

Everybody wants to be confident enough to defend themselves usefully on the street. People often pay lot so money to attend self defence courses, seminars and other events to learn basic street survival tactics. There is one technique however, that is so basic and so easy to learn that many do not even think about it, but can go a long way.

It can be refereed to as the guarding stance. When one realises that a possible attacker is getting a bit too close for there comfort, he/she simply steps forward slightly and places one arm in front, hand on the chest. (A picture of it can be seen below on the cover of Geoff Thompson’s book, The Fence) Although it looks like nothing that can save oneself against an attack, it can definitely provide benefits. Some of these benefits are outlined below.


Increase hand speed with a speed bag.

It stops the attacker from getting close to you – By holding up your arm, it stops the attacker from getting in close to you. He/she may be carrying a weapon and this simple barrier will stop them for using the weapon against vital targets.

Will act as an antenna – Against two or more attackers, your guarding hand can act as an antenna to keep track of where the person being guarded is moving, while you focus your sight on another attacker.

Allows you to easily take a fighting stance - By lunging one leg forward at the same time you guard your opponent, you can easily adopt a stance which you may be familiar, well balanced and comfortable with if the confrontation becomes a fight.

Can stop an attack – The one problem about blocks in reality is that they can sometimes be performed too late. By guarding your opponent, one can very easily stop an opponents strike if thrown, just by simply pushing on his/her chest.

Can draw attention away from other techniques – By guarding your opponent, you are able to draw his/her concentration away from your other limbs, which can be used to strike your opponent if needed.

It is a great set up – By holding one arm forward, in this case guarding an attacker, one can generate a lot of power to strike with the opposite arm. Just like in boxing, by setting up a powerful straight punch, one may throw a jab punch forward first. Also, this helps in “finding” the target in order to carry out a successful punch.

Obviously this guarding position must be taken subtly and in a way where your attacker does not know your intentions. Security workers and police officers sometimes adopt this stance, whilst looking slightly away from there opponents all the while keeping full concentration on them. This is very subtle as the attacker gets distracted by them looking away. When practising this strategy find what works for you. Chances are, when you put your arm up, he/she will push it down or to the side. That’s fine, just keep putting it up subtly whenever that happens. Although this is a simple strategy to protect oneself it still needs relevant practise with in a realistic fashion.

Geoff Thompson calls this technique the fence and has written a very insightful book about its application and effectiveness. If you are interested in learning amore about it, I recommend you check out his book.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Street Fighting, Fighting from the Ground
Does Size Matter in the Martial Arts
One Handed Head Grab
Defending Attacks
Awareness for the Street

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Friday, 8 May 2009

Ronaldo Jacare Souza Highlights

Todays video is a highlight reel of one of the greatest grapplers in the world, Ronaldo Jacare Souza.

The video shows his great ability in utilizing Ko ouchi, O ouchi gari and leg and foot picks during no gi competition. Many BJJ fighters do not use Judo throws to take down there opponents as much as maybe they should be. Jacare proves in this video that they are very effective and can decide which fighter will secure the most dominant position on the ground.

Get your judo gi for less.

Whilst one the ground, he uses great body and hip movement to not only secure the best possible leverage for submissions but also to move around his opponents. By watching the video it is clear that he is quit fond of taking peoples backs. Enjoy!



Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Masakazu Imanari Highlights
Roy Dean Martial Arts
Triangle Choke Variations
Superfoot Training for High Kicking
Dynamic Russian Judo

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 6 May 2009

Rear Bear Hug Defence

Rear Bear Hugs is a part of fighting that many people do not give much thought to. Bouncers and security guards use the technique in order to control aggressive people and multiple attackers control there opponent/s with it. Also, during MMA fights it is not uncommon to see people held via rear bear hugs. They are used to control opponents in order to deliver back throws/suplexes. The Fedor Emilianenko Vs Kevin Randleman fight is a good example of it being used.

As mentioned, many people do not devote much thought, let alone practise time escaping the rear bear hug and it’s a shame. Knowing just a few simple escapes from the hold go a long way and will help martial artists defend themselves that little bit better regardless of there style.


Everlast boxing gloves at great prices.

Some of these simple defences to the hold, which all are applicable for the street and some for competition, include,

Finger locks – If you can manage to grab a finger as opposed to the whole hand which can be easily locked by simply pulling on it, it will be much more effective and should be better for breaking the hold.

Groin attacks – Depending on how critical the situation is, should depend on how you attack the groin. Situations which are not life threatening will require a soft tap and your opponent should let go. If it is a life threatening situation hard strikes, grabs or tears may be needed. Obviously this applies only to male attackers.

Foot stomps – Stomping hard on your opponents feet may be all that is needed to break your opponents hold. If nothing else, it should draw your opponents attention away from holding you tight which should give you a chance to follow up the stomp.

Sukui Nage – To execute this technique the first step is to bring one leg behind your opponent as in the diagram. Then you hold behind your opponents legs with one hand and circle the other in front of his/her waist then behind there back or legs. You then simply scoop your opponent up and dump him/her behind landing on either there head or back depending on how the throw is carried out. From the initial position where you place a leg behind your opponent, this could be enough to break your opponents grip. Alternatives to throwing from this position could be elbow strikes to the chest or face or claw strikes to the eyes if the situation is critical.

Quick turns – Sometimes, if your opponent is not holding you tight enough, you can turn quickly so as you are facing your opponent as opposed to having your back facing him/her. Combined with a swinging elbow strike you may score a very powerful strike which could break the hold.

Defend the pick up – The best way to defend a pick up from a rear bear hug is to wrap you feet behind your opponents legs as soon as he/she starts to lift you up. Also squatting down into a sumo style stance which drops your weight and hips low will make it harder to be lifted.

Freeing yourself from a rear bear hug requires quickness as opposed to technique. The methods in freeing yourself from the hold do not require much training in order for one to be competent using them, but practising this situation is needed so one can develop the quick instinctive reactions needed to escape.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Hook Punch for Karate ka
Mario Sperry Guard Pass
The Banana Split Submission
Reality of Street Fights
Heavy Bag Training - Bad Habits

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Tuesday, 5 May 2009

Visitors Training at your Club

Martial artists who wish to cross train in order to become more complete fighters will at some stage have to visit other clubs, spar with different people and learn new ways of performing techniques. To some this can be very daunting and takes a lot of courage to do so. To the clubs that give visited however, the people training at them can sometimes feel uncomfortable around visitors and may give there club a bad impression.

Below are a few suggestions in which visitors can be made to feel more welcome.


Martial arts supplies at great prices.

Make them feel welcome as you would if you had visitors to your own home. A lot of times, visitors training at other clubs are not even spoken too. For whatever reason this is, it can not only make the visitor feel uncomfortable but can also give your club a bad reputation as an unfriendly place. Introduce yourself and others to the visitors, ask them if they have any questions about the people, training, club etc.

Allow them to train in there own gi/clothes as they are only visiting. I once visited a gym where I was told that I had to wear the same clothing as everyone else to take part. They were only some Kickboxing trousers but I did not have them and was told that I had to pay for a pair and they where not cheap. Even after explaining how I was just visiting the school to see what it was like they would not budge in there decision. I ended up walking out. Allow visitors to train wearing what ever clothing they have. Obviously if there clothing is not appropriate for the type of training and they have to wear something else, LEND them something, rather than insisting that they must pay.

During technique training, try not to correct them even if you know they are wrong in something they are doing. No two people perform techniques in the exact same way, even if they train at the same place with the same coach. Chances are the visitor will be performing techniques different to you, but if it works for them, allow them to continue. Let them do them the way they know. Remember, they are only visiting your club. If they start training regularly with at your club wanting to learn, then, corrections can be made.

When sparring with someone you do not know it can be easy to let pride get in the way of learning. Sparring can become fighting and injuries can occur. Although you know nothing about this visitor to your club, try and keep the sparring an exercise. If you get hit, use it as a way of telling you to fight better rather than a sign that you must also hit them back. Don’t let the sparring get out of control.

These are just a few suggestions in which you can make visitors feel more at ease when training with you. It is important for the reputation of the club that they are felt welcome and pleased with there time training. It also shows that you care about your clubs standards and that you wish for it to constantly flourish.


Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
Martial Art Demonstrations - Tips
The Side Kick in Martial Arts, is it Effective?
Strength Building for Martial Artists
Triangle Choke Variations
Aggression in the Martial Arts

Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Friday, 1 May 2009

Kyle Maynard, a True Fighter

The following video is of award winning wrestler Kyle Maynard. Kyle had his first MMA fight recently where he lost by unanimous decision. However, Kyle received standing ovations when he entered and exited the cage. This is mainly due to the fact that he was born with congenital amputation of the forearms and lower legs.

There are lots of people with will, desire and heart to succeed but many would question weather any posses the amount that Kyle Maynard has. The fact that he is disabled has not seemed to crush his ambitions. Not only is he a motivational speaker but he also holds a wrestling record of 35 – 16.

He is a true inspiration to us all and with the guts and fighting spirit he has, surely we shall all be hearing lots more of him in the future.



Marks

 Subscribe to markstraining.com


Related Articles...
How do I become a UFC Fighter
Shaolin Kung Fu Training Methods
Why Should I Study Martial Arts?
Submission Variations (Armbar/lock)
The Most Influential Martial Artists Ever

Tags: , , ,

Read More...