Thursday, 12 February 2009

Shrimping the Frank Shamrock Way

Any good ground fighter will tell you that shrimping is one of the most important movements when grappling. When you shrimp, what you are doing is moving your hips backwards away from the position they are in, which in turn moves your body. This is used to create distance from your opponent.

In order for hold downs and submissions to be effective there must be correct leverage and control. This is created by keeping very close to your opponent, closing as much of a gap between the two of you as possible. For the person holding down or attempting the submission, this is what is needed for success. For the person defending the hold down or submission however, he/she must move there body away from there opponents, in order to create distance. Shrimping is one of the best methods used to do this.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighters know this. Most of there training time is spent perfecting ground fighting and shrimping away from there opponents is a major part it.

For Judo fighters and Wrestlers, learning to shrimp away from there opponent in order to create distance should be a major part of there training also, but sadly it is sometimes neglected. In Judo and Wrestling competition, fights can be won by being held down for a period of time, so learning to shrimp away to escape hold downs should be practised regularly.

The video below is of Frank Shamrock escaping the side mount (yoko shiho gatame) by using the shrimp method.

Notice how Frank talks about pushing his opponents hip (which also stops his opponent from closing the distance) whilst turning to the side and moving his hips away. With the distance he creates from shrimping he is able to quickly move his knee inside between him and his opponent so as to be in a better defensive position and out of the hold down.

The blow video shows Frank Shamrock now performing a shrimping drill with a partner from the guard.

This time he pushes his opponent head, opposed to his hips then shrimps.

As mentioned, shrimping is very important for all grapplers. It helps you conserve energy whilst ground fighting instead of using brute strength to create distance and it also teaches you to use your hips, which is applicable for striking also. Practise the shrimp every time you grapple so it becomes second nature when rolling or fighting.


Marks

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5 comments:

Adam @ Low Tech Combat said...

Ive never heard it called 'shrimping'. We always just call it 'hips escape' or 'escaping the hips'. Weird hey? :)Very important and fundamental move. Used by white belts (eventually)and black belts alike.

In a way, it is one of the core bjj or submission wrestling skills. Once the hips are escaped, you can turn to the knees to take down, do as shown in the video above or even as a requirement to get some submissions on properly, to get the appropriate leverage, like you say Mark.

For sure, getting this move down will dramatically improve peoples ground game.

Lori O'Connell said...

Cool vid. I've never seen it done as a partner drill.

Ikigai said...

Even for students of Karate (like myself) and other striking arts, this is a good skill to have. If you get caught by a grappler, you'll want to know how to escape from their ground techniques and take the situation back to something you're better suited to.

MARKS said...

Ikigai - Definitly. I myself come from a strong Karate background and understand completly how good hip movement is just as a much a part of each gyaku zuki and mawashi geri as it is when grappling and shrimping on the floor. This excerise would benefit karate ka, no doubt about it.

Anonymous said...

Im not sure that shrimping is neglected.
It is the first exercices we show kids in judo along with ukemis.
It is also part of the curriculum for our countrys national training certificates in judo.

I know there is a lot of fly by night McDojos but we've been to europe quite a few times with our athletes and on exchnage programs and shrimps and reverse shrimps are a stable in other countries.

The great bonus is after one or two floor lengths, the mats are dirt free!!

Damn Utube...videos are gone. It never gets old to see a grown man with braces.

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