Sunday, 30 March 2008

Frank Shamrock vs Cung Le

Frank Shamrock took on San Shou phenomenon Cung Le during last weekends epic MMA fight and to me it was one of the best fights in a while.

Firstly respect has to go out to both fighters. They both proved that they can take clean shots and carry on fighting. Cung kept Frank away with the side kick, a kick not favoured amongst MMA fighters but may be after this fight. It’s a kick that can do great damage by being thrust into your opponent rather than snapped in like the round house. Also witnessed was Cungs ability to catch Franks kicking leg and sweep his standing one. An excellent technique which can make your opponent think twice about kicking you and great to take the fight to the floor. More on this technique here.

Frank Shamrock is one if the greatest technical fighters ever to grace an MMA arena but also showed again that he is a great entertainer. He smiles at his opponent, shows funny hand gestures but also shows his respect for his opponent when getting hit from a good shot, by offering to touch gloves. Frank could not enter round 4 because of a hand injury which saw him forfeit the fight, handing over his championship belt to Cung, but at the end of round 3 Frank dominated Cung with some great punching ability and if the round carried on an extra couple of seconds, maybe the winner may have been different. Being known as a submission fighter it was surprising to not see Frank try and take the fight to the floor much, and it was clear that Frank wanted to keep the fight standing. This showed that Frank truly is a mixed martial artist who is capable of fighting from all angles and positions.

Because of the way the fight went, its most probable that there shall be a rematch between them. If that happens, it should prove again to be one of the most anticipated rematches ever.

This truly was a great fight, if you have not seen it yet, then search it on the Internet and watch it on one of the hundreds of websites showing it. You will not be disappointed.


Marks

Related Articles...
A Rare but effective Strike - The Superman Punch
Fighting Strategy, Taking the Centre of the Ring
Spinning Roundhouse or Spinning Backfist, Really?
Training Through Strain
The Mighty Front Kick
Technorati Tags: ,, ,

Read More...

Saturday, 29 March 2008

One of the Best Counter Strikes

Living in the 20th century seems to be much more dangerous than the years past. There are constant muggings, gang violence and many instances where martial arts training will come in handy. All martial arts seem to be based on a certain principle, to be used for self defence only. Sometimes though, should you wait to be attacked before you counter with your own techniques?

One of the best ways to counter an attack is to attack first pre-emptively. For those of you who have heard of pre emptive striking, you shall be familiar with what I mean. For those that do not, consider this scenario. You are walking home after work and have taken the subway. As you are walking you notice two men ahead walking closely together in your direction. As they get nearer to you, they space themselves apart as if trying to walk either side of you. You all continue to walk and as you get within a few feet of them, they both coincidently reach within there pockets. Sensing that you are in trouble, as soon as you get within striking distance of one of them, you lash out with a kick to his groin and then quickly push him onto the other whilst running away.

You countered there attack, by attacking first, pre-emptively. Of course, this is just a quick example, but we have all been given the ability to sense when trouble is about to happen. If your in a bar and you see someone constantly staring at you with bad intent, you don’t have to be psychic to know a situation could develop.

Some see pre emptive striking as something which is completely against what self defence means, after all you struck first. But maybe the question should be, who THOUGHT of attacking first. Taking the above example again, the two men approaching, thought first of attacking and if the victim did not counter pre-emptively, he/she could have ended up hurt or worse. Pre emptive striking is something that must be considered by all people wanting to defend themselves on the street. It is a type of awareness and must be studied well.


Marks

Related Articles...
What Martial Art is the Best to Learn
Self Defence Training for All Martial Artists
Standing Locks, Effective or Not
Advice for Judo Street Fighters
Common Sense in the Martial Arts

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Thursday, 27 March 2008

Kata Gatame Choke

Kata Gatame is one of the most effective hold downs in Judo competition. It can be quite easy to gain a victory with it but what is easier and what not many Judoka tend to do is apply a choke from it.

It is used as a choke SOMETIMES by Judoka but not as much as it should be. BJJ and MMA fighters always apply a choke from this hold down position.

From the Kata Gatame position,


(Picture taken from http://mail.widzew.net/~maciejb/judo/gfx/duszenia/kata_gatame.gif)

Simply squeeze your arms together while placing pressure on your opponents arm with the side of your head.

As already mentioned, this is not a new technique, but it is amazing to see so few Judoka using it as a simple to apply choke, rather than a hold down.


Marks

Related Articles...
Karo Parisyans Knee Bar from an Ankle Lock
Striking and Not Striking whilst Ground Fighting
The Best Judo Tip for Throwing
Fighting Against the Cage
Submission Fighting and Submitting

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 26 March 2008

Need for Speed, Movement Speed

Every martial artist has a need for speed. When two people are fighting or sparring, physical speed plays a great role in deciding the outcome of the event. Explosive speed is crucial to a fighter as are power, timing and stamina.

One of the best ways of creating this type of physical speed is by carrying out quick dashes. These quick dashes can be performed in many ways. The most common way is doing short sprints. Weather it be 100 meter sprints or any other distance, the aim is to complete the sprint as fast as you can, which means moving your arms and legs as fast as you can. This type of training is great for building up the fast twitch muscle fibres in the body. For martial artists, more specific types of quick dashes can include,

Shooting in on an opponent as fast as possible.
From a fighting stance, bobbing and weaving as fast as possible.
Standing 2 meters away from a heavy bag, gliding in, and hitting with a jab as fast as possible.
Performing a high kick on a heavy bag as fast as possible.
From a grappling position, scrambling around to your opponents back as fast as possible.

The list is endless. If you notice with each example given above, they are ended with “as fast as possible”. Doing these techniques fast is different from doing it as fast as humanly possible. Normally when we train, we perform our techniques fast, but not as fast as we could be performing them. As a test, stand up and jab as fast as you can. Then do it again. Then do it another 5 times one after the other, trying to do it faster each time. You probably noticed that you did it faster the last time than you did the first time right? By concentrating on doing it faster each time, you shall eventually enhance your movement speed. Be it a jab, throw, kick or anything else.

A great way to improve this movement speed is, at the start of your training session once you are warmed up and fresh, pick one technique from whatever fighting style you train, and concentrate on performing it as fast as you can. Carry on doing the technique for about 1 minute. After the minute is up you should notice that you are performing quite fast. After a few weeks of this, you will notice your speed developing. Although this is very simple to do, it is amazing that not many people actually do it.


Marks

Related Articles...
Fighting Strategy, Taking the Center of the Ring
Common Sense in the Martial Arts
Workout speed
Raw Strength (Squats on One Leg)
Raw Speed

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Monday, 24 March 2008

Heavy Bag Training - Bad Habits

The heavy bag is one of the most popular training devices for martial artists and boxers. It has been used for many years to simulate an opponent. Strength, timing coordination and stamina are all improved whilst training with the heavy bag for a period of time. But should the heavy bag be used all the time?

My personal opinion is that it should not. The main drawback to the heavy bag is its whole purpose, which is to be hit without hitting back. Because it does not hit back some hard to break habits can be developed. The most common is dropping your guard when punching and when moving. Its something that is seen more with beginners, but also can be developed by advanced martial artists. Training whilst someone is watching you on the bag can be valuable for this reason. When your guard drops you may not notice yourself, but the person watching should and inform you of it. Another common habit which is developed is relaxing after hitting. Because the bag will swing backwards when it is hit, you may fall into the habit of relaxing slightly and losing concentration whilst it swings backwards then forwards. The reason why this habit is developed is because you become used to the timing of hitting the BAG, but the timing of hitting a person is much different. Most of the time, if you throw a strike at an opponent, he/she will counter quicker than a bag would swing back at you, so it is ideal to keep this in mind when training.

There are many other bad habits that can be developed when bag training, so keep in mind always that hitting the bag is different to hitting someone when sparring or fighting. In his book, The Art of Expressing the Human Body, Bruce Lee warns of too much bag use, as the types of bad habits shown above can easily be developed. Using the heavy bag is a definite must for all martial artists, but it must be used cautiously and balanced out with focus pads, sparring and other training methods.


Marks

Related Articles...
Heavy Bag Tip - Punching Through the Target
Martial Art Training Methods of the Past
Ultimate Fighting vs Boxing
Training to Failure, Martial Arts and Life
Heavy Bag Tips (for Beginners)

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Friday, 21 March 2008

Overtraining, Signs and Treatment

Overtraining in martial arts and weight training is common. To be the best you have to push yourself to limits that surpass your normal boundaries. Weather by lifting heavier weights, sparring an extra two or three rounds, aiming to complete an extra thirty press ups or trying to roundhouse kick a couple of inches higher, these types of goals must be set and met if you are to become one of the best. However this is where overtraining comes in and where you may do more damage than good.

Overtraining signs which I have experienced through my training include,
Aching of muscles,
Constant drowsiness,
Falling to sleep very quickly,
Boredom of training,
Not being able to focus on everyday tasks,
Loss of weight (muscle weight as well as fat) whilst eating the same amount
.

As I said, these are just my experiences through overtraining. You may experience different signs or maybe non of the above. But whenever I feel any of these, I cut back slightly and give my body a chance to recuperate.

The aching of the muscles, loss of weight, drowsiness and quick sleeping can be dealt with quickly. By giving training a rest for a couple of days, these issues seem to take care of themselves. But boredom of training and losing focus on everyday tasks seem to take a week or maybe two to deal with. I am not quite sure of why this is, but it could be because I am mentally drained from the repetitious movement’s martial art and weight training entails. Taking time off and focusing on other things in my life really does help in this area, and up to now, once I take a break, I come back to training with extra vigour, motivation and strength.

To be the best you have to train hard, but you have to also train smart. There is no point going into the gym for a chest workout, when you blasted your chest the day before and it is still aching even when you warm up. Your body will tell you automatically if your overtrained so listen to it. Rest according to your bodies wishes and you should come back stronger.


Marks

Related Articles...
Fitness Training Through Martial Arts
Dieting and Cravings
Common Sense in the Martial Arts
What Type of Training for What type of Goal
How I Improve my Stamina

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 19 March 2008

Female Fighters

Should there be women fighting? In the martial art and boxing world, this is a very controversial topic. Obviously some say yes and some say no. Is it seen as expressly forbidden or is it that really big a deal.

People are used to seeing men fighting. Since the dawn of time, man has been given the image of going out and hunting daily, encountering beasts and adversaries, while the women stay at home and watch over the children. Well times have changed. In today’s day and age, sometimes it is the woman of the house who goes and earns the money for the family while the man stays at home and becomes a house husband. Has this had a negative effect on society or given a bad image towards women or men?

With regarding the world of combat sports, maybe men have dominated for most of the time. Jack Dempsy, Rocky Marciano, Ali, Tyson. These are all boxers from different eras, but are well remembered even today. I don’t know weather many people remember any women fighters from the same periods of time. But like mentioned above, times are changing. Laila Ali, daughter to Muhammad Ali, MMA sensation Gina Carano and others have, and continue to make household names for themselves.

Training martial arts for fitness purposes is one of the best workouts. Benefiting your cardio, you also work the muscles for toning, conditioning and greatly enhance your flexibility. Because of this type of training, which is fun and does not produce massive muscles and popping veins, women are training in martial arts for these purposes. Being in the gym or dojo, it is very easy for them to see fighters in action and become interested in it, which is leading many female fighters to compete. Is this really a bad thing? Is it different if two men fight rather than two women?

As mentioned, this is a controversial subject, and shall probably continue to be one for many years. The fact is that women do fight and shall continue to fight. It has not produced bad side effects and the idea of competing can help women to better themselves in some aspects just like with men, so why should they stop.


Marks

Related Articles...
Does a Black Belt make you an Expert
Fitness Training through Martial Arts
Comman Sense in the Martial Arts
Dieting and Cravings
Spinning Roundhouse or Spinning Backfist, Really?

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Monday, 17 March 2008

Attacking Vital Points when Grappling

In the martial arts world, when people talk about vital points they usually refer to striking vital points using different weapons such as the fingers, single knuckles, etc. A good method which can be used when grappling is to press the vital points to cause pain and to momentarily draw attention away from a specific attack.

Imagine you are ground fighting with your opponent, and you are in a cross arm bar (juji gatame) position, except for the fact that your opponent has his arms folded and you are finding it hard to straighten them. Then you attack a vital point on his/her wrist by pressing hard on the inside middle part of the wrist exactly where all the veins and nerves are. This will create pain in the wrist of your opponent who’s attention will then be drawn to that pain, and away from trying to keep his/her arms bent to defend the arm bar, allowing you the opportunity to quickly straighten his/her arm when they are not thinking about it, and gain the victory. Or how about this scenario. You have gained the back of your opponent and have hooked your feet around the inside of his/her thighs and are looking to apply a rear naked choke (Hadaka jime) but your opponent is defending well by tucking his chin in not allowing you to feed your arm round his neck. Using your elbow, you press at a vital point just underneath his shoulder blade hard, which will cause pain to your opponent, who shall thrust his/her chest forward to relieve that pain, and shall also raise his/her chin slightly, allowing you to quickly pass your arm round the throat then neck. You then apply the choke and gain the submission.

These are just two examples of how vital points can be used in grappling as well as when striking. Experiment yourself with a partner from different positions. From the mount, side mount, guard, an ankle lock position or anywhere else. Even from standing positions, when your opponent resists techniques or throws, press vital points on his/her body in order to draw attention to the pain and away from resisting the technique, which should leave you able to apply what you are trying to do.


Marks

Related Articles...
Vital Point Striking for All Martial Artists
Drawing an Attack in a Fight or Sparring
Karo Parisyan's Knee Bar from an Ankle Lock
Ground Conditioning for Fighting
Striking and Not Striking whilst Ground Fighting

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Friday, 14 March 2008

A Rare but Effective Strike - The Superman Punch

The superman punch, as it has been known in MMA events is seen as a relatively new technique, but chances are, it has been used by fighters from striking backgrounds for many years and it has been a regular point scorer in karate tournaments for many years.

To employ the technique from a southpaw stance, you feint a kick with your left leg, then as you leg is off the floor, you push vigorously with your right which pushes your other leg off the floor also. Then you swing your left leg backwards whilst performing a left cross punch.

By feinting a kick first, this technique has the advantage of maybe lowering your opponents guard, as he/she may think you are kicking to a low target, which will enable you to quickly and powerfully punch towards the unprotected head area. If the technique does not work, it should at least help you bridge the gap to your opponent by quickly jumping in towards him, allowing you to concentrate on close range striking or grappling, if you prefer this type of combat. The best way to practice this technique is first on the heavy bag, starting softly and working speed and power over time. When you become proficient with the strike, practise with a partner who is moving around holding some hand pads. It shall be harder to move around and perform the technique but over time the proper co ordination, distance and balance shall be obtained.


Marks

Related Articles...
Vital Point Striking for all Martial Artists
Striking and not Striking whilst Ground Fighting
Heavy Bag Tip - Punching Through the Target
BJ Penn's Elbow Strike
Striking and Breathing

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Thursday, 13 March 2008

Karo Parisyan's Knee Bar from an Ankle Lock

For those who have checked out my site, you will notice that I like to include posts about techniques that are rarely seen and rarely practised. I was thinking of posting an article about a defence to an ankle lock when I came across this video by MMA fighter Karo Parisyan. Its a great defence to an ankle attack by performing a knee bar which can also act as a calf crush. Its painful. It works well when your opponent does not have his feet crossed. Enjoy!



Marks

Related Articles...
An Old Submission Hold - The Reverse Guillotine
An Old Submission Hold - The Crucifix
Standing Locks, Effective or Not
A Judo Neck for Grappling


Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 12 March 2008

Which Martial Art is the Best to Learn

When someone who has never trained in martial arts before makes the decision to do so the first thing they ask is “which martial art is the best”. That’s a fair enough question. Obviously no one wants to be doing something that is a waste of time and not practical. The true answer to that question is that there is no martial art which is the best. But there is a martial art which is best for YOU.

To find the right martial art for you, you need to ask yourself a few questions. Firstly, what type of martial art catches your eye. Do you like the flashy kicks of teakwondo, the dynamic throws of judo, hitting the bags in a Mauy Thai class or maybe the rough and tumble of submission wrestling. You need to know, because you’re never going to excel in a martial art if you find it boring. You’ve got to want to go training, not go just because you’ve paid your annual fee at the start and you don’t want to lose out.

Secondly, you need to be realistic about yourself when choosing a martial art. A small guy weighing 150 pounds with very little strength may go to a sumo class a few times and find that he is getting belly flopped all over the place where a big 250 pound hulk may find he/she is doing well in that martial art. On the other hand, both guys may go to a kung fu school, and because of his/her quickness and mobility, the smaller guy may love it and the big guy may find it hard to move as fast as the others. You need to look at what God gave you physically, and match a martial art to what you are suited to.

Lastly, you have to be opened minded. To find the best martial art for yourself, which should lead to the best way of fighting (for sport or street) for yourself you need to understand that each martial art has something to offer. No matter what anyone says about some martial arts being practical and others not, you will always find something that other martial artists do differently and you may be able to include this in your personal repertoire to achieve better results. There will always be those also who stick to what they know as being “the be all and end all”. Some martial art teachers claim that all they learn in there own gym or school is all that is needed, but that is far from correct. Start out with one martial art, train in that for a while, then go and cross train to gain further knowledge.

These are some points that should be reflected upon when trying to establish the best martial art to take up. It all depends on the person, there is no one martial art that stands out above the rest, and there never will be.


Marks

Related Articles...
What Martial Art is Best for the Police
Does a Black Belt make you an Expert
Standing Locks, Effective or Not
Sacrifice Techniques, Good or Bad
Shadow Fighting, The Martial Artists Way

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Read More...

Monday, 10 March 2008

Fighting Strategy, Taking the Centre of the Ring

Cage Rage 25 saw Ken Shamrock get beaten by a fighter called Robert “Buzz” Berry. Ken and Frank Shamrock have always been my favourite fighters and even if Ken lost another 500 fights, his status as a legend in MMA is always going to be there in my mind as he has done so much for the sport. Maybe he should quit maybe he should not. That’s up to him, but his heart is among the best around.

A strategy that has been employed by Ken and passed to Frank and most of his Lions Den fighters throughout the years is taking the centre of ring. Once the bell before each round rings, you come out of your corner and take a position in the centre of the ring. To some, this strategy shows dominance, control, authority and can decide the outcome of the fight sometimes. By taking the centre of the ring or cage you are saying to your opponent “here I am, am not afraid to fight, im not afraid to exchange blows, Im a problem, deal with me!” Just by doing this you can make your opponent become a defensive and negative fighter, you cut off the fighting area so he/she has limited space to move and in the judges eyes you can sometimes be noticed more. This will help in gaining a decision at the end of the fight if there is no knockout or submission

As mentioned, this was always the strategy employed by Ken Shamrock, and could well be one of the reasons why he was seen as such a dominating and fearsome fighter in the nineties. To be able to pull this strategy off, all you need is courage. The courage to show your opponent that YOU are the one in control of the fight. Usually the one who takes the centre of the ring wins, and is not just a strategy for the bigger guys. Smaller fighters who also employ this strategy include Rickson Gracie and Genki Sudo. Do it once and you will have the courage to always do it.


Marks

Related Articles...
Kick Catching for Throws and Takedowns
Comman Sense in the Martial Arts
Fighting against the cage
Drawing an Attack in a Fight or Sparring
Does a Black Belt make you and Expert

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Sunday, 9 March 2008

Rickson and Royler Gracie Demo

This is a video which im sure you have all seen before. It is Rickson and Royler Gracie demonstrating there finesse at Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Included in the vid is some basic self defence from a variety of strikes and some sparring. Although Rickson dominates for most of it, it is amazing to see the way in which both transition into technique's so elegantly and smoothly. Enjoy!

Marks

Related Articles...
An Old Submission Hold - The Reverse Guillotine
An Old Submission hold - The Crucifix
Dynamic Russian Judo
Submission Fighting and Submitting

Technorati Tags: , ,

Read More...

Friday, 7 March 2008

Spinning Roundhouse or Spinning backfist, Really?

In the martial arts, especially the striking ones, there has always been excitement when spinning techniques are used. Weather they land on there target or not, people seem to always raise there eyebrows while shouting “wow” then they are performed. But do they really work and are they worth practising.

Spinning techniques, including spinning back kick, side kick, back roundhouse kick, back fist and many more are powerful. No doubt about that. Because you add a spin to the technique you create extra torque and momentum which leads to extra power, so if the technique lands flush on the intended target, it will hurt. When watching MMA sensation Cung Le perform a spinning kick he usually knocks his opponent backwards many feet, so it must deliver some force. Plus through countless training of spinning techniques you will develop awareness, concentration and your peripheral vision. Awareness and concentration will be trained through the actual spin. With techniques such as hook punches and front kicks, because you are looking at your target without spinning round, sometimes it is easy to lose concentration when performing the techniques, but when you do spin, you have to keep an image of where you opponent is, or where he is moving to, in order to hit him/her. Also, as you have spun around sometimes you don’t have the ability or time to look at your opponent square on, but may be able to see him/her out the corner of your eye so you do develop your peripheral vision this way.

How about some disadvantages then. Well, they are slower techniques than without the spin. The spin will take up a bit of time and before you have spun completely around, an accomplished striker may already have anticipated the technique and moved away. Also it is easy to lose control with a spinning technique if you don’t hit, so if your opponent has moved away and you lose control, it could be easy for him/her to counter you which could prove painful. Then there is the long theory of never taking your eyes off your opponent. Well with spinning techniques you do, only for a split second, but again your opponent could counter your technique because of that split second.

Spinning techniques are like any other. They must be UNDERSTOOD. By this I’m not saying practise them until your blue in the face, but understand that they can be used when the time is appropriate, so do practise them along with other techniques using them wisely, and also understood that they can be used against you, so keep your guard up just in case.


Marks

Related Articles...
Is Sparring Useful in the Martial Arts
Training to Failure, Martial Arts and Life
The Mighty Front Kick
The Backfist (Uraken)
Martial Artists Plateau Effect

Tags: , ,

Read More...

Thursday, 6 March 2008

Dynamic Russian Judo

The Russians are known in the Judo world for being excellent pickup specialists. There throws are dynamic, powerful and agility is needed to be able to pull some of them off. The following is a video which shows not only there abilities in throwing, but some of there abilities in escaping throws and pickups. Enjoy!


Marks

Related Articles...
How to Sprawl for Fighting and Training
A Judo Neck for Grappling
Advice for Judo Street Fighters
The Best Judo Tip for Throwing

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Read More...

Wednesday, 5 March 2008

An old Submission hold - The Reverse Guillotine

The reverse guillotine is one of the most dangerous submissions in all of combat. It is a crank technique that puts a great amount of pressure on your opponent’s neck and spine and MUST BE USED WITH GREAT CAUTION IN PRACTISE. It must never be done at full speed.

Like all submission holds, it can be applied from many positions, but I shall explain in this article how it can be applied from an upper four quarters hold on the ground, and with your left arm and knee. (This will make sense after you have read the article)

Picture from http://www.ajajudo.org/Syllabus/4th-kyu.html

The person on top is the one applying the submission. From here you wrap your left arm around the back of your opponents head and grasp your hands together as you would when performing a standard guillotine choke (Your opponents head should be under your left armpit)

Then you bring your left knee off the floor (resting your weight on the right knee and left foot. Whilst you do this, because your opponents head is secure under your left armpit, it lifts off the floor also.

To gain the submission you simply arch your hips forward and pull your opponents head up, applying pressure to his/her neck and back. To make the submission even more effective, you can stand from this position then arch forward.

There are many variations to this submission and should be studied greatly in order to gain understanding of them. As mentioned above, this is a dangerous technique and is best practised under the guidance of someone who knows what there doing.


Marks

Related Articles...
An old Submission Hold - The Crucifix
Ground Conditioning for Fighting
Underhooks, Grappling Close Quarter Combat Control
Submission Fighting and Submitting
How to Sprawl for Fighting and Training

Read More...

Tuesday, 4 March 2008

Fitness training through Martial Arts

When training martial arts, you need to develop speed, power, rhythm, co ordination and many other attributes. If you have all these, with time, you should become a great fighter. But what if you’re not interesting in fighting, what if you just want to get fit and are bored of running around the same block where you live.

If this is you then your martial arts training should be different to others. For instance, a person enters a Thai boxing gym and sees someone pounding a heavy bag as hard and fast as they can for 1 minute. If he/she does the same, would it be best for getting into shape? It will certainly develop some great power and technique over time, but maybe it would not benefit there fitness as much as two miles of running would. This is not to say that performing martial art type movements are not good for them, but like mentioned elsewhere in this blog, the type of training you do for the goal you want to achieve is vital.

To achieve good fitness through martial arts, running, swimming or whatever, the key is repetition and to pace yourself. After learning a handful of punches and kicks and gaining the ability to perform them in combinations you can easily create your own workouts.

Try setting a timer for ten minutes to begin with and at a medium (not fast) paced level perform your martial art movements. Its as simple as that. Start off with basic techniques from a fighting stance like bouncing backwards and forwards and side to side then after about twenty reps add a jab or maybe a couple of punches, then again after more reps of that, incorporate low kicks building up height as the workout continues. Just make sure you pace yourself. It can be very easy to get carried away and start punching and kicking as hard and as fast as possible, but you must control yourself to not do this, otherwise you shall be burnt out within a couple of minutes. It’s the same as when you’re running. If you pace yourself you may be able to continue for thirty or forty minutes. If you sprint from the start you will be finished in two. Keep controlled, start with simple movements and work up to combinations involving three or more techniques as the workout develops. If you find yourself getting tired throughout the workout, rest by returning to simple movements like jabbing only whilst bouncing back and forth, and when you have some energy back, return to combinations with kicks and punches. Remember to have some music you like to keep you going and some water handy. Apart from to rest, you should not stop to think about what technique you are going to perform. This is not training for a fight so perform whatever comes naturally. A good idea is to also incorporate bodyweight exercises like press ups and sit-ups into the workout. Experiment and over time you should have your own martial art fitness routine.


Marks

Related Articles...
What type of Training for What Type of Goal
Workout Speed
How I improve my Stamina
Home Workout Part 1
Heavy Bag Tips (for Beginners)

Read More...

Monday, 3 March 2008

Anderson Silva vs Dan Henderson UFC 82

UFC 82 Pride of a Champion saw Anderson Silva gain a submission victory over Dan Henderson via a rear naked choke. The fight started with both fighters being very cautious with each other, exchanging a few strikes before Henderson managed to take Silva down and control him in a dominating position, landing some good but not very hard hammer fist blows to the face of Silva. After some work on the ground Silva managed to defend himself by controlling Dan in his guard but it seemed like the round went to Dan. However after this, it must have woke Silva up because he dominated thereafter. His strikes showed why he is one of the best fighters the UFC has ever seen. His kicks and punches were crisp while standing, forcing Dan to the ground. After trying, but failing to shoot in on Silva from the floor, a short ground fight pursued and not long after Silva managed to land the rear naked choke that saw him gain the victory just in time before Dan fell unconscious.

Two great warriors fought but only can reign as champion, and Anderson Silva showed great mixed martial arts ability yet again, by dominating whilst standing, via some excellent strikes and whilst on the floor, with some great grappling and by one of the all time classic submission holds.

Read More...